Prize-winning animation of Blake’s ‘The Tyger’ by Y12 student

Radheya Jegatheva, a Year 12 student at Perth Modern School, Australia, has created a prize-winning animation of William Blake’s ‘The Tyger’:

The Tyger

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AUqowAVgZxA&feature=youtu.be

Narration is by Jay Jay Jegathesan.

It’s a beautiful short film (great for introducing students to Blake) which has just won the following awards:

BEST FILM – Asiagraph Reallusion 2016 3D Film Competition (Taiwan)
BEST JUNIOR SHORT FILM – Warburton Film Festival (Victoria, Australia)
BEST AUSTRALIAN FILM, Summer 2016 – Sydney World Film Festival (Sydney, Australia)

In conversation with… Ian Hislop

Ian Hislop, satirist, broadcaster, historian, and editor of Private Eye, chats to Roehampton’s Dr Mary L. Shannon about his new radio play ‘Trial by Laughter’ (co-written with Nick Newman) which dramatizes the trial of William Hone for libel in 1817, press freedom, and the importance of satirical images in the nineteenth century.

Click here to access the podcast and to get the full story.

Mary L. Shannon and Ian Hislop Private Eye

RIN members: request for help

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Dear All,

Thank you so much for continuing to be part of the Romantic Illustration Network, and for following the RIN blog.

We are interested in how membership of RIN has impacted upon the work and interests of all our members who are not university academics: artists, illustrators, independent scholars and everyone with a general interest in visual culture and/or illustration etc.

Has a post on this site generated any new ideas for you? Have you visited an exhibition advertised on the blog? Have you been inspired by something you heard about via RIN? We’d love to hear from you!

Drop me a sentence or two at Mary.Shannon@roehampton.ac.uk, and I will make sure future posts contain more of the info that you find useful and exciting.

 

Hone and Cruikshank: BBC Radio 4 Drama by Ian Hislop ‘Trial by Laughter’ now on iplayer

The Gamecock of Guildhall

BBC Radio 4 drama ‘Trial by Laughter’ is now available on iplayer for just over 20 days.

Written by Ian Hislop (the editor of Private Eye and a team captain on ‘Have I got News for You’) and his long-term collaborator Nick Newman (a satirical cartoonist for The Sunday Times and Private Eye), ‘Trial by Laughter’ is a  comedy drama based on the real transcripts of the trial of William Hone in 1817.

William Hone is the forgotten hero of free speech in Britain. He was a bookseller, publisher, printshop-owner and satirist – George Cruikshank was his friend and collaborator . In 1817, he stood trial for ‘impious blasphemy and seditious libel’. His crime was to be funny. Worse than that he was funny by parodying religious texts. And worst of all, he was funny about the despotic government and the libidinous monarchy.

Original music by Conrad Nelson
Director/Producer Gary Brown

For clips, the cast list, and background information on the trial, see http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b071h2x6.

Click here to read Nick Newman’s article on Cruikshank and Hone for the BBC website.

For information on the William Hone collection at Adelphi University, USA, see http://libraries.adelphi.edu/archives-and-special-collections/special-collectionsfinding-aids/hone-collection/.

Researching visual, print and material culture in the UK?

ArtResearchersGuidesLibrarians and archivists around Edinburgh, Dublin, Manchester, Leeds, Cardiff and South Wales, and Liverpool (coming in October 2016) have put together guidebooks that take researchers to treasures such as letters between Cruickshank and his publishers,  centuries-old sketches featuring Kirskstall Abby, and photos of the Cottingley Fairies.  There are botanical illustrations so realistic you feel compelled to stroke petals and illuminated maps, manuscripts and charters with the paintings of Queen Elizabeth I, whose elaborate signature officially classifies as a work of art itself.  Many of these gems are not online.

“These are handy, well designed little booklets,” says art historian, Mark Westgarth, “loosely drawing on the format of the ubiquitous city tourist guides.  They are portable, user friendly and fit in a coat pocket.”

“All these cities have fantastic collections on architecture, design and history broadly defined, but researchers don’t know how to get their hands on everything they might need — this guide helps solve that problem,” says Rose Roberto, book historian at the University of Reading and series editor.

Introductions to each guide have been written by leading scholars such as Christine Casey and Ben Read.  Through a visual narrative, all guides point the way to libraries and repositories with unique and under used resources.  Indexed by over 80 subjects, all guides include citywide maps, navigation icons, and a time-saving subject index to collections and colour images of each place.

“What makes these guides useful is the map and index.  If you’re doing research on fashion history, for example, the visual index shows which places have the right material, and whether it’s a book, archives, or audiovisual format,” says Racher Myers, former design librarian at Leeds University.

Published by the Art Libraries Society of the UK and Ireland (ARLIS), these  pocket sized guides range in price from £4.50-£8.00 each.  The books are available as a set or individually from the ARLIS website, http://arlis.org.uk/periodicals-libraries-sources/publications as well around the different cities featured in the Art Researchers’ Guide series.

New Open Access Journal: British Art Studies

Published jointly by the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art and the Yale Centre for Studies in British Art, British Art Studies is a new online, open access, peer-reviewed journal for new research and scholarship of the highest quality on all aspects of British art, architecture and visual culture in their most diverse and international contexts.

British Art Studies is one of the few completely open access journals in the field of art history, providing a forum for the growing debate about digital scholarship, publication and copyright. The Editorial of the first issue is an interesting summary of the aims and digital strategies of the journal.

Issue 1 (Autumn 2015) is avaliable now.

 

New Plays Added: The Romantic Illustration Network Shakespeare Gallery

New plays have been added to the RIN Shakespeare Gallery!

https://romanticillustrationnetwork.wordpress.com/shakespeare-gallery/

To zoom in on the images and see all the details clearly:

  • click on the thumbnails to see them in a larger size
  • click on ‘view full size’ (bottom right)
  • click on the full size image to zoom in, and you can also scroll left/right and up/down