Lewis Walpole Library New Exhibition: “James Gillray’s Hogarthian Progresses”

“James Gillray’s Hogarthian Progresses”

Exhibition on view April 6 – September 16

The Lewis Walpole Library

154 Main Street, Farmington, CT 06032

Sequential narration in satiric prints is most famously associated with the “modern moral subjects” of William Hogarth (1697–1764): Harlot’s Progress (1732), A Rake’s Progress (1735), Marriage A-la-Mode (1745), and Industry and Idleness (1747) among others. HP_publicity-images_enews-lg-1Less well-known is the broad spectrum of legacy “progresses” produced by subsequent generations drawing both on Hogarth’s narrative strategies and his iconic motifs. James Gillray (1756–1815), celebrated for his innovative single-plate satires, was also among the most accomplished printmakers to adopt Hogarthian sequential narration even as he transformed it according to his unique vision. This exhibition presents a number of Gillray’s Hogarthian progresses alongside some selected prints by Hogarth himself.

Curated by Cynthia Roman, Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Paintings, The Lewis Walpole Library.

Exhibition open Wednesdays, 2-4:30 pm, and by appointment

Further information about the exhibition and associated programming

Birkbeck 19th C Forum: Tuesday 26 January, ‘Julia Margaret Cameron: New Discoveries’ with Marta Weiss and Colin Ford

Birkbeck Forum for Nineteenth-Century Studies
Spring 2016 Programme

The first event of the spring term for the Birkbeck Forum for Nineteenth-Century Studies will feature Marta Weiss (Victoria & Albert Museum) presenting on ‘Julia Margaret Cameron: New Discoveries’ with Colin Ford (Former head of the National Museum of Photography, Film and Television) responding. This event is presented in collaboration with the History and Theory of Photography Research Centre at Birkbeck, and will take place Tuesday 26 January 2016 from 6.00pm to 8.00pm in the Keynes Library, 43 Gordon Square, London, WC1H 0PD.

This seminar will explore the new material Martha Weiss discovered while researching the current must-see exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum, marking the bicentenary of the birth of Julia Margaret Cameron, 150 years after she first exhibited her work there. Colin Ford has worked extensively on this important photographer, most notably in the comprehensive catalogue Julia Margaret Cameron: Complete Photos (Getty, 2002).

The session is free and all are welcome, but since the venue has limited space it will be first come, first seated.

For further information on the exhibition, see: http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/exhibitions/julia-margaret-cameron/about-the-exhibition/

Download Julia Margaret Cameron: Complete Photos (Getty, 2002) here: http://www.getty.edu/publications/virtuallibrary/0892366818.html

For further information on the History and Theory of Photography Research Centre, see: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/arts/research/photography

For further information on the Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies, see: http://www.cncs.bbk.ac.uk/

British Museum: Napoleon Exhibition and Events

Napoleon caricature BM
©The Trustees of the British Museum

Bonaparte and the British: prints and propaganda in the age of Napoleon

5 February – 16 August 2015

Venue: British Museum
Entry: Free
Address: Great Russell Street, London, Greater London, England. WC1B 3DG

This exhibition will focus on the printed propaganda that either reviled or glorified Napoleon Bonaparte, on both sides of the English Channel. It explores how his formidable career coincided with the peak of political satire as an art form. 2015 marks the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo – the final undoing of brilliant French general and emperor Napoleon Bonaparte (1769–1821). The exhibition will include works by British and French satirists who were inspired by political and military tensions to exploit a new visual language combining caricature and traditional satire with the vigorous narrative introduced by Hogarth earlier in the century. This exhibition includes work by James Gillray, Thomas Rowlandson, Richard Newton and George Cruikshank.

Download a list of exhibition-related events at the British Museum here.