CFP: ‘Romanticism and the Arts’ SAMLA, Durham, North Carolina, USA (13-15 Nov. 2015)

Call for Papers
‘Romanticism and the Arts’
an affiliated session of the Keats-Shelley Association of America South Atlantic Modern Language Association Conference
Durham, North Carolina, USA (13-15 Nov. 2015)
Deadline: 15 May 2015

This panel seeks papers related to second-generation Romantic-era British writers and/or their literary circles, so proposals addressing the works of John Keats, Percy and Mary Shelley, Lord Byron, Leigh Hunt, and William Hazlitt will receive priority. Proposals that engage with the conference theme (“In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts”) are especially welcome. Subjects to be considered might include (but are not limited to) Romantic literature in relation to music, concerts, songs, painting, engravings, caricatures, drawings, panoramas, book arts, calligraphy, dance, theatre, opera, architecture, sculpture, china, pottery, ceramics, textiles, and, in later contexts, electronic art, film, and photography.

Please send a 250-word abstract, bio or CV (one page only), and audio-visual requests to Ben P. Robertson, Troy University, (bprobertson@troy.edu) by 15 May 2015.

Meet your fellow-RIN Members (1)

In the first of what will hopefully be come a series, RIN member Michael Demson tells us about his current research:

‘Hello, I’m Michael Demson, and I am an assistant professor of English at Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas, where I teach undergraduate and graduate courses in Romanticism, World literature, and literary theory. Currently, I am working on a book-length study on transatlantic radicalism, agrarian politics, and Romantic literature, a project supported by an American Council of Learned Societies’ Fellowship for 2014-2015.

The first few chapters of this book will explore critiques of agricultural improvement in literary, philosophical, and political correspondences during the 1790s between such figures as Thomas Jefferson, Constantin-François Volney, and William Godwin (a transatlantic network of radicals that this anonymous 1798 cartoon sought to expose, figure 1.). The subsequent chapters explore later Romantic novels (Cooper, Hugo, Trollope) profoundly affected by the radical critique of improvement developed during the decade of revolutions.

Figure 1

Figure 1

I’ve also published articles in Romanticism, European Romantic Review, Nathaniel Hawthorne Review, among others, and my graphic novel, Masks of Anarchy: The History of a Radical Poem, about the second life of Percy Shelley’s 1819 lyrical satire among garment workers in New York City at the turn of Twentieth Century, was published by Verso Books in 2013 (figure 2.). You can reach me at demson@shsu.edu.’

Figure 2

Figure 2